• Quiz - Inequalities

    Posted by Kurt Waldner on 3/13/2020

    Today in class, we took the 40 point quiz on inequalities.

    There is no homework.  Have a wonderful long weekend.  GO LIONS!!

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  • Inequality Review

    Posted by Kurt Waldner on 3/12/2020

    Today in class, we checked the homework from Page 339-340.  We reminded students about including the point or not (open or closed circle) and the direction of the graph.  We also made a huge deal about the magic words...divided (or multiplied) by a negative which means we need to switch the sign.  We answered any questions and reviewed more for the upcoming quiz.

    For homework, review for the quiz on inequalities.

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  • Inequalities

    Posted by Kurt Waldner on 3/10/2020

    Today in class, we finished going over the examples for solving inequalities.  We reviewed open circle (< and >), closed circle (< and >). We looked at using the quick way to graph as long as the variable is on the left side of the inequality.  We reminded students about switching the signs when we multiply or divide by a negative number.  Finally, we looked at situations that ended with infinite solutions or no solutions.  These will happen when there are the same amount of variables on both sides.  If the resulting inequality is true then there are infinite solutions.  If the resulting inequality is false then there are no solutions.  We then used the majority of class to work on the assignment.

    For homework, complete Page 326-327 #19-28 and 41-55, Page 334 #35-45 (odds), and Page 339-340 #20-28 (evens) and 32-40 (evens).

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  • More Inequalities

    Posted by Kurt Waldner on 3/9/2020

    Today in class, we ramped up our discussion of solving inequalities.  We looked at a few compound inequalities and then the procedure for solving an inequality.  This is similar to solving an equation with one and only one difference.  Any time you multiply or divide by a negative, you need to switch the inequality symbol.  We will work on a few more examples tomorrow and then use the majority of the class on the assignment.

    There is no homework.

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  • Inequalities

    Posted by Kurt Waldner on 3/6/2020

    Today in class, we started a discussion about inequalities.  We pointed out two important things to help students.  The first was using a test point to determine if the shading was done correctly.  If the test point makes a true statement, the test point would be in the shaded region.  If it is false, the test point would not be in the shaded region.  We also mentioned a quick way to determine the direction of the shading.  If, and only if, the variable is on the left side of the inequality, the shading will go the direction the inequality symbol points.  We demonstrated how to use the solution as a boundary point and use the inequality symbol to determine if the point is included or not.  If the symbol is < or >, then the point is included and we would use a filled in circle.  If the symbol is < or >, then the point is not included and we use an open circle.  We worked through some examples and will look at more next week.  

    There is no homework.  Have a great weekend.  GO LIONS!!

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  • Returned Quiz

    Posted by Kurt Waldner on 3/5/2020

    Today in class, we returned and checked the 26 point quiz on parallel and perpendicular lines.

    There is no homework.

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  • Quiz - Parallel and Perpendicular

    Posted by Kurt Waldner on 3/4/2020

    Today in class, we took the quiz on parallel and perpendicular lines.  

    There is no homework.

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  • Slope, Parallel, and Perpendicular Review

    Posted by Kurt Waldner on 3/3/2020

    Today in class, we reviewed all things parallel and perpendicular in preparation for the quiz.

    For homework, review for the quiz on slopes, parallel, and perpendicular.

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  • Slope, Parallel and Perpendicular

    Posted by Kurt Waldner on 3/2/2020

    Today in class, we returned the two previous assessments (one out of 14, the other out of 22).  The first was meant to determine if students understood the concept of parallel and perpendicular lines.  This should have been relatively simple...just find the slope and determine if the slopes are the same (parallel lines) or opposite reciprocals (perpendicular lines).  However, the results were not good.  So the second part was meant to break it down even further and see if the students knew the different formats of an equation (slope intercept, point slope, standard form, and the slope formula).  It was also meant to see if students knew the two conditions necessary for lines to be parallel or perpendicular.  Finally, we checked to see if students could find the slope of a situation.  Some of these should have been relatively simple, especially if the equation was given to us in slope intercept form or point slope form.  Others just required students to find the slope using the slope formula (y-y/x-x).  There were a few that required students to convert from standard form to slope intercept.  Once this was done, it was just a case of seeing if the resulting slope was the same or the opposite reciprocal of one of the original slopes.  We will finish going over the solutions tomorrow, review the concepts, answer any questions, and then requiz on Wednesday.

    For homework, review the notes on slopes, parallel, and perpendicular.

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  • Quiz - Parallel and Perpendicular (Slopes)

    Posted by Kurt Waldner on 2/28/2020

    Today in class, we took an additional part of the quiz.  Students needed to demonstrate their ability to find slopes given different situatioins.  

    There is no homework.  Have a wonderful weekend.  GO LIONS!!

    **If you are dancing at Mini-Thon, have fun!  Thank you for working towards a cure for pediatric cancer.  FTK!

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